7 American Stereotypes

A stereotype is a general idea that many people have about one group of people. For example, ‘all Chinese people are good at math’. Whether or not it’s true, many people believe it. That’s a stereotype. I worry that if I write about the stereotypes of, for example, Canadians, or

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A, An, The

A, AN and THE are called articles. – A and AN are used for non-specific nouns. If you don’t know WHICH thing you are talking about, or don’t care, use A or AN. Examples: Could I have an apple? There’s a serious problem with my tennis unitard. I want a cat for Christmas. Yo

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Learning Idioms

Expressions are certainly a big part of Fluent English. However, it’s important to know how and when to use them. If, for example, you use too many expressions or use only one expression in a certain situation, the point of the expression is lost. So, here are three common expressions and h

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Adjective Order

Today’s topic is THE ORDER OF ADJECTIVES. When you have more than one adjective before a noun, which one should go first? Should you say, ‘big yellow house’ or ‘yellow big house’? (psst, the first one) Generally, we can place adjectives into groups or categories, and

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Being Polite

If you say things too directly, others may feel uncomfortable; they might think you’re being rude (even if you don’t mean to be). Often, the WAY you say something is much more important than HOW you say it. So, today let’s go over examples of how we can soften direct questions a

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Attitude is Everything

I had a student a long time ago. This student had really really poor English. One day the student asked me: ‘Luke, I’m not getting better. Why can’t I improve?’ I said, ‘Maybe you don’t improve because you care too much. You care too much about what others think. You care too much about how

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New Expressions

An expression is a common phrase with a certain meaning. Today I want to share three common expressions with examples. Ready? – 1. Hard to come by This means something that you RARELY find or see. It’s often about people (but not always). Examples: “An honest man is hard to come

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Check it out!

‘Check it out’ is a very common phrase in spoken English. Basically it means, ‘to look at, to see or to try something’. Here are some examples of how to use it: There’s a new bookstore that just opened downtown. I want to check it out tomorrow if I have time. I’

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Using Common Prepositions

I found some really great examples of how to use simple prepositions. Today, I would like to share these with you. – OF Used for belonging to, relating to, or connected with: • The secret of this game is that you can’t ever win. • The highlight of the show is at the end. •

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7 Words

Today, I want to share several ordinary words that you might not know. If you already know these words, congratulations! It means you have a pretty good vocabulary. 1. Nostrils (noun) Your nostrils are the two holes in your nose that you breathe through. I’ve never met anybody with one nost

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Bruce Lee

English names have a certain order. Let’s learn the order, then I’ll show you how you write your full name in English. My full name: Luke Aaron Priddy First name: Luke Your parents choose it for you when you are born. Middle name: Aaron Any name between the first name and the last nam

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Useful Word: Beat

Lots of words have lots of meanings. Today we’ll focus on BEAT. – Beat (verb) Meaning: Defeat Even the best tennis players get beat sometimes. Germany beat Argentina in the World Cup. You can’t beat the taste of home-cooked food. We should leave early so we can beat the traffic.

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